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Krutarth Vasavada's REVIEWS AND RATINGS

Ratings by Krutarth (4)

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Reviews by Krutarth (2)

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Eureka Forbes Aquasure Amrit 20 L Gravity Based Water Purifier : Water Purifier
Price: Rs. 2299
This Item is currently Out of Stock.
The purifier DOES NOT work.
on 06 September 12
Krutarth rated:
certified buyer

Regarding the Purifier:

The purifier DOES NOT work. The moment water is poured, its tap starts leaking ! I filled the upper tank with 10 Liters of water and started expecting pure water in the lower tank. To my surprise, its tap started draining water out. This is completely not acceptable. I have recorded a video and taken some photographs which I can share if need be.

Regarding the Delivery:

The product was delivered amid heavy rain to me in Pune (September 5, 2012 8:30 pm) . Completely wet from outside. If I would have ordered it from Aqua Guard site itself, the delivery person would have helped me in assembling the product. The Flipkart courier delivery person did not help in assembling it. Since this product was relatively simple and I had past experience of assembling similar products I could manage to assemble it somehow. However, it raises my concern about ordering the products which I may not be assemble by my own - as there wont be any help from Flipkart Home Appliances Delivery Person.

Regarding the Warranty:

We are given neither an appropriate bill / invoice nor the warranty card is stamped with the name of dealer / seller. Since the call center executive of Aqua Guard requires the said details, I was not able to get the help from them either !

In this situation I had to offer the company with these options.

(1) I no longer wished to use this non-performing product.
(2) I demanded earliest replacement of the product without any additional cost on me.

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India : A Portrait : Book
Price: Rs. 699
In Stock. Delivered in 5-6 business days.
A Wonderful Account of India
on 27 May 12
Krutarth rated:

A country that is second only to China from the perspective of economic miracle and second to none in its potential to influence the new century, India – i.e Bharat or Hindustan for some – is fast witnessing series of transformations the world has ever seen. In this dazzlingly panoramic book,

Patrick French depicts that epic change and the foundation of these changes. Patrick uses human stories to explain a larger national narrative.

There seems to be a new book on India every few months these days (how things have changed!) – but honestly only few of these books are actually worth reading. When I learnt that Patrik French has written on India, I knew it would be good. Patrick is a smart guy who has spent a lot of time in India over the last decade.

Earlier Patrick has already written an excellent book on the Indian freedom struggle and the decades leading up to it in addition to his critically acclaimed biography of V.S Naipaul. And the book is good- you will learn a lot about India by reading this book – Patrick is genuinely interested in the country and is very well informed. But this book falls short of the extremely high standards that Patrick has set for himself in the two earlier books that I mentioned. It is not that I have too many specific criticisms – but I was expecting even more from Patrick – some startling insight into issues or some new way of looking at familiar topics that I haven’t thought about before.

You could also consider the issue of women. India has done very poorly in fighting gender discrimination (the record here is even worse than on the caste issue). But even here the picture is far from uniform. For example, India has more female CEO’s among financial sector companies than USA. Then there is the miracle of Indian democracy (despite all its flaws). No country which is as poor and as diverse as India has resilient democratic institutions and a (largely) free press of the type India today has. Typically countries start developing representative political institutions at a much later phase of their development when they have a large and well educated/relatively prosperous middle class. In this respect, India can be a good example to many poor African countries which are experimenting with democratic forms of government. (perhaps a more ethical alternative to the authoritarian Chinese model).

The way to write about India is not to impose a single narrative on the country – whether that narrative is “a feudal backward country steeped in poverty, caste prejudice and gender inequities” or “an emerging global economic superpower with millions of entrepreneurs and scientists” but to be open to multiple narratives and how they intersect and conflict with each other. India is all that and more. This seems obvious given that India has more people than all of Africa combined and is just as diverse. A good writer like Patrick is someone who can look beyond some of the more obvious stereotypes and cliches. Patrick is keenly aware of the many complexities and contradictions of the Indian experience and he manages to convey some of that to the reader. The book has several interviews with an interesting cast of characters and more than a few telling anecdotes. Patrick writes well and has a good sense of humor! Overall, I would recommend this book strongly.

The narration is from the three major perspective which are,

Part 1 – Rashtra (i.e. Nation)

Part 2 – Lakshmi (i.e. Wealth)

Part 3 – Samaj (i.e. Society)

Last Word
[Beauty about India is,] Nearly everyone has a reaction to India, even if they have never been there. They hate it or love it; think of it as mystical or profane; find it extravagant or ascetic; consider the food for the best or the worst in the world. For east Asian it is a competitor and source of some of their own spiritual traditions. For Americans, it is a challenge, a potential hub of cooperation or economic rivalry. For many Europeans, India is a religious place with a special, undefined message. For British, it is a link to old prestige, a land interesting mainly in the past tense. For the Pakistanis, it is a sight of threat and fascination.- Partick French in India – A Portrait [p. ix]

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