Prince of Ayodhya - Book One of the Ramayana

Prince of Ayodhya - Book One of the Ramayana (English, Paperback, Ashok K Banker)

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Prince of Ayodhya - Book One of the Ramayana  (English, Paperback, Ashok K Banker)

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    Highlights
    • Language: English
    • Binding: Paperback
    • Publisher: Penguin
    • ISBN: 9780143033332, 0143033336
    • Edition: No UK Rights, 2005
    • Pages: 522
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  • Description

    This is the first book in a series that retells the ancient Hindu epic Ramayana, a series that fits into the genre of fantasy fiction.

    Summary Of The Book

    The book is loosely based on the events that happen in the beginning of the epic, Ramayana. This book covers the events from the time Rama is announced as the heir to the throne till the time he is on his way to Mithila, to attend Sita’s swayamvara. The setting is the city of Ayodhya, the impregnable city, the capital of the kingdom of Kosala, currently ruled by Dasaratha, who is Rama’s father.

    Demonic forces, led by the Rakshasa king Ravana, are planning a massive attack on the city of Ayodhya. Sage Vishwamitra knows of this and is on his way to Ayodhya to warn the king and to seek his help in battling the demons of the forest where he is conducting a powerful two century long yagna.

    The book begins with Prince Rama having a dream in which he sees Ravana and his forces utterly destroying Ayodhya. He wakes still continuing his battle with the demons in his dream.

    Dasaratha goes to see his First Queen, Kausalya, who is the mother of Rama, and informs her that her son Rama is about to be crowned as the heir. Dasaratha also informs her that he himself is terminally ill.

    The people of Ayodhya are overjoyed to hear that their beloved Prince Rama is to be crowned as the heir to the throne. The third queen, Kaikeyi, is enraged to hear this news and threatens to kill Kausalya.

    Meanwhile, Vishwamitra is on his way to Ayodhya in the guise of a low born hunter, to escape harassment from evil forces. In the palace he finds that the king and Sage Vashishta are already welcoming and honoring Sage Vishwamitra, an impostor. Vishwamitra himself enters the palace and exposes the impostor to be a demon named Kalanemi, Ravana’s uncle.

    Vishwamitra asks Dasaratha to send Prince Rama with him to battle the hordes of demons in Bhayanakvan where he is performing his two century long sacrifice. Dasaratha refuses at first, as he fears for his young son, a boy who is not even sixteen years old yet. But he is eventually persuaded by Sage Vashishta to agree to Vishwamitra’s request. Lakshmana, Rama’s younger brother, who is very close to him also accompanies Rama on his journey.

    The book then details the fight at Bhayanakvan, and the incidents that take place there.

    About Ashok K. Banker

    Ashok K. Banker is a former journalist and literary critic turned author. His novels are spread across many genres, from crime fiction, and later, stories based on Indian mythology.

    Ashok Banker is now identified with his retelling of the ancient Indian epics, especially the Ramayana. Other books by him include Amazing Adventure at Chotta Sheher, The Missing Parents Mystery, Siege of Mithila, Armies of Hanuman, Bridge of Rama, King of Ayodhya, Vertigo, Byculla Boy, Beautiful Ugly, and Sons of Sita.

    Banker has written many works of fiction spanning different genres. Three of his first books were crime fiction stories. He also wrote three semi-autobiographical novels based loosely on his on life.

    Ashok Banker was born in 1964 in Mumbai, to an Anglo-Indian mother and a Gujarati Hindu father. He was brought up by his mother and grandmother. His mother had converted to Islam to secure a divorce. He had a multi-religious background. When he was given the freedom to choose his religion, he opted to choose none. He grew up in a Christian household and was educated in a Jewish school. He worked as a freelance journalist, contributing columns and cover stories to mainstream publications like The Times of India and Outlook Magazine. He also worked as a literary critic, reviewing contemporary Indian literature.

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    Specifications
    Book Details
    Imprint
    • PENGUIN
    Publication Year
    • 2005 February
    Contributors
    Authored By
    • Ashok K Banker
    Author Info
    • Ashok Banker worked as a successful freelance journalist and columnist for several years, breaking front-page news for publications such as The Times of India, Mumbai, and cover stories for Outlook magazine, New Delhi. Banker is a contemporary Indian novelist often counted among the significant literary names in post-colonial Indian literature. His work is the focus of several academic studies for its cross-cultural themes and realistic portrayals of Indian urban issues. He was earlier also known as a reviewer and commentator on contemporary Indian literature, and as a candid essayist with a particular focus on media hypocrisy in India, and the western racial bias against South Asian writers. Banker has published in several genres, ranging from contemporary fiction about urban life in India to multi-volume mythological epics, as well as cross-genre works. Three of his early novels to be published were crime thrillers, claimed to be the first written by an Indian novelist in English. They gained him widespread attention. The stories of his "Devi" series are short works featuring avatars of the Hindu goddess Devi, and have appeared in various science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazines. Three of his novels contain autobiographical elements and are closely related to one another. His first novel (though the fifth published) Vertigo is about a man struggling to make a successful career and home life in Bombay (the former name of Mumbai). Byculla Boy takes its name from the Byculla suburb of Bombay where he and his mother grew up. Beautiful Ugly and the complementary documentary of the same title are a tribute to his mother, portraying the tragic events of her life. He was a prolific literary critic and reviewer, known for his candour and bluntness in reviewing books by Indian authors. His views often veered from the outright derogatory to effusive praise. He is one of few contemporary Indian authors writing in English to be included in prestigious anthologies such as The Vintage Book of Modern Indian Literature and The Picador Book of Modern Indian Literature.
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    Ratings & Reviews
    4.2
    44 Ratings &
    16 Reviews
    • 5
       23
    • 4
       15
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    5

    Excellent narration...same epic in a contemporary style

    This is the first book of the series...I have bought all the volumes without a penny of regret... I had read the earlier versions of Ramayana by Rajaji, partially Tulsiramayan and heard snippets of Kamban... Authors respect to them with is acknowledged additional flavour provided a new avenue of epic narrations which seems to be a case for many of the other Indian authors to follow... Mr. Banker seems to keep up his promise that he makes towards his first book...i.e. to write about Mahabharat...
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    Dhananjay Rao

    10 May, 2012

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    5

    AMAZING!

    I read the first 6 books (8books total) of the series in college around 5 years back.

    I guess it's just the subconscious that leads you to read stuff that appeals. What appealed to me was Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and the Illiad!

    This book made the Ramayan get more respect from inspite of being a Catholic because of its sheer scope and depth in the various characters, especially Ravan. The whole series (til the 6th one) left a couple unanswered questions but I must say this is THE cla...
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    Lenin DC

    Certified Buyer

    1 Feb, 2012

    5
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    5

    Good !

    buy if you wanna read ramayana

    its good telling and keep you engrossed till the end.

    Thankyou flipkart

    :)
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    Aayush Agarwal

    Certified Buyer, Dehradun

    6 Sep, 2014

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    5

    Good read for Mythology lovers

    I love reading about ancient India and epics. Same goes for Mythology.
    This book shows how different writers write books in their own ways. I
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    Santosh Kumar

    Certified Buyer

    16 Jul, 2014

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    4

    Well blended mythology+fiction

    If one doesn't skip the Author's Note, this book doesn't disappoint. Fiction and mythology are blended fine in Mr.Banker's well endowed writing prowess. Some combats are described in hair raising fables. I am half-way through book 4 right now and every book has been completely worth a read.
    Combats, emotions, morals and suspense are all well populated through the books.
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    Alok K

    Certified Buyer, Bangalore

    11 Jun, 2014

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    5

    Wonderful... engrossing. Must read

    I recently got this book from a local library and after reading first few pages, just couldn't put it down. Ramayana is told in a different and most engaging way. Ashok Banker knows how to hold interest of the readers till last page. The book seems to be have written after lot of research (as I can relate the incidents with the information I got after reading other mythological books). However the author can break some long sentences in smaller ones for the readers to digest them.
    I am now r...
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    Sandeep Patil

    30 Dec, 2013

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    5

    Brilliant story telling

    The classic epic of Ramayana re-presented by Mr. Ashok, is a kind of internationally acceptable version..
    Story is definately a huge work of his own fiction while ultimately this modern Ramayana crosses the classical facts of Valmiki's Ramayana as well..
    Carrying a lot uniqueness in its own, this epic is amazing as it doesn't fail for even a second to make you visualize the plot you are reading..
    Ultimately author has presented an indian theme in a universal writing style...
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    Garvit Arora

    Certified Buyer

    10 Jul, 2013

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    4

    Sadagopan Govindan

    A good, enjoyable book. The author's attention to details paints a vivid picture as the story progresses. This provides yet another perception of the epic that we have read as a kid

    The book was delivered the next day I ordered in flipkart.
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    Sadagopan Govindan

    Certified Buyer

    28 Mar, 2012

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    1

    Trashy pulp fiction

    Off lately there have been phenomenal number of books on mythology with authors giving their own creative twist. This particular book is trash. Its like reading mills and boons than anything else. A complete let down. While Devdutt Patnaiks and Amish Tripathis are writing amazing books on mythology, this one I'd just allow it to pass by. Unfortunately bought the sequel too!
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    Shivani Lakhotia

    20 Apr, 2012

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    5

    Terrific

    Nice one
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    Shikhar Jaiswal

    Certified Buyer, Allahabad

    14 May, 2017

    0
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